Day in the Life

I realize that many of you might not know what a dialogue coach does, so I thought I would outline a (fairly) typical day from pickup to drop off.

8:00 Pickup: This sounds like a pretty cushy pick up time, and it is. Pickup times can often be 6AM or earlier. I’m picked up with the 3rd AD who lives nearby, and we feign small talk. We then promptly attempt to go back to sleep, as it’s a bit of a drive to the studio.

9:00-11:00 Read Thru: The entire production is currently prepping for February, which involves a reading with the actors, director, writers, and other key people involved in production. I sit there furiously taking notes, just trying to keep up. I use readings as a chance to re-familiarize myself with the scripts, and to build a plan of action for the month of February.

11:00-12:30 Prep Time: Read thrus always give me a lot to think about, so I make a beeline to the trailer to process my notes and to start researching.

I first review the February schedule so that I know which scenes will be filmed first. I also look through the scripts and research any words or names that I’m unsure about. I then create some prep work for the actors to prepare for February. I personally enjoy putting together all of the hardest words and sounds from the read thru into a few sentences that they can practice. This is because I’m evil.

Finally, I contact the 2nd AD about scheduling in longer prep sessions with individual actors so that we can prep every scene before filming.

12:30-13:30 Private sessions: I check in with the actors I’m working with, and we re-run the scenes that are going to be filmed today. We also may run future scenes, or discuss any questions or concerns they have ranging from their vocal health to the script.

13:30-14:30 Lunch Break: Obviously the highlight of the day.

14:30-20:00 On Set work: Normally I get on set around 8AM, but because of the read thru I don’t have to come on set until after lunch. I am handed headphones from the sound department, and I make my way towards a monitor to be able to listen, watch, and take notes.

I tend to go in after each take to tell the actor what is going well and which sounds they should change. It requires a good ear and fast thinking, as I only have a few moments between takes to work with the actor. On set I also work closely with the writers, the director, and the script supervisor so that the accent, the voice, and the words are all perfected.

20:00 Leave set: I am again shuttled home with the 3rd AD, but this time we talk for real about the day, about our separate jobs, and about the pluses and minuses of the business. Just like any other job.

21:00 Arrive home